PERRANUTHNOE is a small village on the South Coast of Cornwall, just East of Marazion, there is a Car Park and sloping access to a safe sandy beach and the beachside Cabin Cafe. It has The Victoria a superb multi award winning pub, which serves super food both lunchtimes & evenings, - a Church dating back as far as 1160. The Lynfield Centre which houses The Cowhouse Gallery, Kernewek Ky, Professional dog grooming The Peppercorn Cafe, a hairdressers and Linen & Clay.

Saturday, 22 February 2014

Wherrytown, Penzance. Friday from Mike

Some super photos from Mike - this one showing the terrible damage to the rock armour that was protecting the Promenade.
 Here you can see a little of what it used to look like and the damage done - the level of the beach is of course much lower than recent past
Fossilised tree exposed by the storms.  Geologists believe extensive forests extended across Mount's Bay in Penzance between 4,000 and 6,000 years ago.
Cornwalls Geoconservation Group, said: "The forest bed at Wherry Town on the west side of Penzance has not been exposed to this extent for 40 years or more. The storms have revealed two to five metre trunks of pine and oak as well as the remains of hazel thickets with well-preserved cob nuts and acorns washed out by streams running across the beach."
 St Michaels Mount in Cornwall was once known as 'Karrek Loos yn Koos' which translates as 'Grey Rock in the Wood', with John of Worcester, writing in 1099, that St Michael's Mount was located five or six miles from the sea, enclosed in a thick wood. radiocarbon dating on timber from the peat beds in Mount’s Bay and it is thought that extensive forests extended across the bay between 4000 and 6000 years ago when hunter gatherers were giving way to early farming communities.Submerged forests are evidence of the changes in the bay as sea level has risen since the end of the last glaciation.

8 comments:

  1. Fascinating....it reminds me of 'Seahenge' that came to light on the Norfolk coast, a circle of tree trunks as I remember, someone in their wisdom moved some of them to a museum !!!!! there's also part of a petrified forest too at low tide .Difficult to imagine St. Michael's Mount inland.Poor Wherrytown.....lots of expense to put that right !Thanks Sue really enjoyed the info.and pictures too.macca.

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    1. I suppose if the storms subside then all will be covered by sand and shingle again, so it is fascinating to see what is exposed.
      Looks like some sand is wasing back into Perran already - hope tomorrows wind isn't too bad or it will be off again !
      Quite a fine day today with hoards of people walking the footpaths - nice to see ! Sue

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  2. Fascinating to read that the Mount was so far inland. I'd love to see those prehistoric trees.

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    1. I hadn't heard that it was thought to be quite so far inland - I'd read about it being surrounded by woodland - at this rate it will end up a mile from the coast due to erosion. Bet the trees were magnificent. Sue

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  3. Wow, all very interesting Sue. If any good has come from that dreadful weather and damage it would be the fascinating information which has been revealed. Jane .

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    1. There have been several film crews down there with experts etc. whilst it's interesting it would be wonderful for the sand to come back - preferably before Easter ! Sue

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  4. So nice to see the daffodils in the fields, but those mobile homes are a real blight in that area. Sorry to those who disagree, but Praa Sands could have remained a lovely beach if there had been a negative planning decision back when they were mooted. At least Perranporth's are hidden in the dunes and not so visible.
    It is amazing to think St Michael's Mount was so far inland. I must tell our American visitors who went there with us on Boxing day. They will enjoy hearing that piece of history. Thanks, Sue.

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    1. The first field of Daffodils I've seen properly this year.
      There have been caravans etc at Praa for many years, but the site was sold to this company and really piled them in.
      I was amazed to read the piece about St Michael's Mount as I'd read that it used to be in a wood, but not that far inland. Quite amazing what has been uncovered by the storms both in the SW and Wales.

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